Tag Archives: rink

Following My Own Instructions: A Plan for this Skating Season.

By Katherine Ruch

Fall is in the air. I make this statement for a whole variety of reasons. The kids are back in school, the school supplies have been bought, Labor Day has come and gone and, most importantly, the ice rink has already been open this season for a few weeks!! While it was closed, it sure seems like I did my fair share of driving to other rinks, complaining about how I missed skating as well as plotting my return.

Looking back on it, is seems that summer flew by faster than ever this year. As the skating year gets off to a fresh start, I must begin to consider where I’m trying to go with skating this year. How in the world do I expect to get anywhere if I don’t put some thought into where it is that I’m trying to go? It would be somewhat like taking a trip without knowing where you were going or having directions.

What is your plan for this skating season?

I’m finding it slightly comical that I told my students they had to make a list of goals they would like to accomplish this year, while I am having trouble making myself do the same thing. I know the rules – you want to make goals that are short and long term and for all areas of your skating.

In terms of this year, I’m having trouble because what I have come up with so far has either been too vague or too pie in the sky. Goals that are too vague include: improving my jumps and spins. What does that really look like? In terms of pie in the sky: landing that elusive Axel seems to come to mind. It really doesn’t get more pie in the sky than wanting to land an Axel before the Mayan calendar runs out in 2012 if I haven’t even started seriously working on it!

So, down to brass tacks! Here are some legit goals for the year and the future:

  1. Find a few competitions to go to this year for myself, and pick a couple to take my students to. I think it may be best to coach at a couple and compete at a couple. I get nervous enough for myself and my students, that combining the two doesn’t seem like a great plan.
  2. Work on the Gold Moves so that I can hopefully at least test them at the end of this skating year. The keyword here is “test” not complete. Although, it would be delightful to pass them the first time!
  3. Finish the Bronze Dances this year- Hickory Hoedown down, the Willow and the Ten Fox still to go.
  4. Improve jump height on all singles and eventually land that darn Axel.
  5. Improve spin positions on sit spin and camel, learn layback and flying camel. Place the emphasis on eventually for that flying camel
  6. Move towards my goal of only teaching Moves in the Field. I’ve discovered this has to be my niche. I love the technical side of skating!!

Now the question goes to you! What would you like to accomplish during this skating year?

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Summer and the Closing of an Ice Rink

By Katherine Ruch

I would be the first to admit that I have a love hate relationship with ice skating. It really seems to depend on the time of year. Summer means a bunch of different things to different people. Most associate the summer with the kids being out of school, family vacations and rising temperatures. Lots of people enjoy the slower pace of summer while others are counting down the days till the kids go back to school so that things can go back to life as “usual.” I hate to admit it, but I am one of those people. It’s not that I have anything against summer, it really just says more about the fact that my life pretty much revolves around ice skating.

 

The concept of summer has changed a great deal for me since I was a kid. I used to long for the day when I could have a couple months off without having to worry about school. I could do all the things I dreamed of doing and had what seemed like endless stretches of time to fit it all in. Ever since I became involved with ice skating, I have begun to associate the climbing temperatures with the annual season closing of the rink.

 

Everyone knows that you always want what you can’t have. I find that a great majority of my time during the summer is taken up by skating and yes I know that sounds hypocritical since I just mentioned the fact that the rink is closed. While I’m not spending hours on the ice each day during the summer months, that doesn’t stop me from thinking about skating almost all of the time, even while I’m asleep.

 

While I am working at that pesky part time job, I can also be found figuring out the logistics of what it looks like to keep skating during the summer. The questions that often swirl in my head involve: “where to go skating next and when? Who can I talk into taking a few lessons during the summer? Are there any conferences, seminars and competitions that I want to go to either for my own skating or to help with my coaching endeavors?” The most looming question of all has been “what possessed me to want to enter a competition during the off season and how am I ever going to get in enough practice time?”

 

For those of you whose rinks don’t close during the summer, consider yourself very lucky. It is quite common when the pools open for ice rinks to just close up shop for awhile. Most don’t want to go skating when they can go to the pool. If your rink is open, try to get in as much practice time as you can this summer. If your rink is not open, don’t let that discourage you. If you are a skater, talk to the other skaters or your coach about carpooling somewhere to get some ice time in. If you are a coach, round up those students and take trips to other rinks. As somebody who has skated at lots of other rinks over a number of years, it is not nearly as scary as it may seem to go skate somewhere else for a couple of hours. While each rink has its own set of unwritten rules, one thing holds true and that is that there are people everywhere who love skating. That is something that will hopefully never change!

 

@IceSkatingWorld

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New Page! Jobs in Figure Skating

IceSkatingWorld LLC has partnered with Simply Hired to provide an employment section to help people get started in the great sport of figure skating or find their dream job in the industry.

Looking for a full, seasonal or a part time position at an ice rink? Click here for the IceSkatingWorld.com’s Jobs Board. If you are seeking an ice skating career, this is your site.

Ice Rink Managers: Reach thousands of interested and qualified skating enthusiasts by posting your job listing on our Jobs Boards. It’s only $12 for a 90-day listing!

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How to Dress for Ice Skating

by Ryan English

If you are just an average ice skater and you only skate for fun, probably any type of clothing will good enough as long as it will keep you warm. But for professional ice skaters, dressing appropriately is very important. It is included in the whole package of being an ice skater. Sometimes, one still has to consult the experts on how to dress for ice skating. Below are the steps on how to properly dress for ice skating:

If you are dressing competitively, you need to consult a seamstress for your competitions. They will customize the dress with the perfect cut, color and fabric that will suit you best. You cannot just buy dresses like these from the stores because they are not perfectly fitted to your body. it needs to have the exact size of your body shape.

You also need to sharpen your blades right before the competition. There are blade sharpeners that you can buy. Having a sharp-bladed skate will ensure that you movements on the ice will have less friction. It will allow you to move faster in a more precise manner.

Next step is to buy top-quality tights for ice skating. Thicker tights are best for use because they will keep you warm while on the ice. Ice skaters need to be exposed with such cold temperatures because of the area they are skating but they cannot wear pants. With thick tights, it will give them the warmth they need to avoid cramps with the cold.

Women ice skaters usually have skating dresses and leggings while the men wear fitted tops and leggings as well.

For the casual ice skating, the only important thing is to cover the limbs so that it will be warm enough while they skate. If in case they fall off the ice, they have pretty warm clothes to cover them.

It is also important to layer clothes before hitting the rink. You don’t need to wear such thick winter clothing because you will eventually get warm as you skate. Just layer your clothes so that if you stop skating, you can tolerate the chill.

The hair needs to be tied back. This will enable you to stay focus on the ice without being distracted by your waving hair.

Gloves are also good for the ice. It will keep your hands warm while you skate.

No matter how you dress when you are going for casual skating will be fine. As long as it is going to be warm enough for you and that you will be able to skate properly. It is actually better than of the professional skating dresses. They actually feel really cold while skating and still have to manage to skate well on the ice.

If you dress for ice skating, safety, warmth and being able to skate correctly is the most important.

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Ice Skating Tips For Figure Skaters

by Francis Murphy

While some novice ice skaters decided to learn ice skating all by themselves which are possible, it is actually recommended to get some professional skating lessons if possible. There are many advantages of taking these lessons and it is not hard to find a skating rink which is near to your home.

Here are what we can share on Ice skating tips:

a. How to fall: Falling is unavoidable especially for new learners in ice skating but falling can be risky at the same time. Thus it is valuable to learn how to minimize the risk of injury when falling. Some good tips would be to wear ice skating protective gear set such as helmet, wrist, elbow, knee and hips pads to minimize the impact of the injury.

b. Getting professional guidance on ice skating if you are a beginner is the most important tips of all. This is the only way where the beginner can learn how to fall without injuring himself, how to stand still and how to skate properly.

c. If you are skating outside the ring, making sure that the ice is thick enough to support your weight is some basic pre-skating checking to safe-guard your safety.

d. Learning how to make an abrupt stop swiftly is one of the key tips for every ice skater – this is called the Hockey Stop. Then there are T-Stop, Snowplow Stop, and also backward T-Stop and other kinds of stopping tips which one gets to learn to be a good ice skater.

e. Wear warm, comfortable clothing and appropriate socks made of microfiber or synthetic are the best for ice skating. Keep in mind that the rink’s temperature is 50-60 degrees, therefore a light jacket, sweater, windbreaker is advisable. Get some gloves or mitten made of wool or acrylic type is best.

f. It is important to make sure you tie your ice skates the correct way. It is best to tie your skates fairly loose at the bottom part. In the middle part of the skate, where the ankle is, it is good to pull the laces tight. This will give the support that your ankles need to hold you up while you are skating. And at the very top part of the skates, it should be the loosest part so that it will be easier for you to bend your knees which is very important in ice skating.

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The Most Commonly Performed Jumps in Figure Skating

If you are a figure skating fan you have no doubt heard these terms used throughout the many competitions you’ve watched. In some cases you may even recognize them, but in most cases it is up to the narrator or announcer, or whatever they are called, to tell us what moves the skaters are making on the ice. Something I noticed during the 2010 Olympics was that the announcer wasn’t necessarily naming every move the skater made. There were, for example, a number of jumps that occurred that were not even mentioned. It was almost like I was “expected” to know what the move was.

With that in mind, I did some research on the top basic figure skating jumps that every figure skater must know. When skaters learn them, they learn them from simplest to most difficult, so that is how I will list them. Also keep in mind that higher point values are applied to the more difficult jumps and that all of these jumps can be performed as a double or triple jump, raising the level of difficulty, except for the waltz jump.

  • Waltz Jump-the waltz jump is performed by the skater leaving the ice from the forward foot outside edge of the skate. Making a half revolution in the air, the skater lands on the back outside skate edge of the opposite foot.
  • Salchow, pronounced “sal-kow” is named after Ulrich Salchow, who first originated this jump in 1909. This jump is performed from the back inside edge of one skate to the back outside edge of the other with a half revolution in the air and is usually done from a ‘forward outside three turn’ or from a ‘forward inside mohawk’ move. After the preceding move, the skater stops for a split second with a leg extended behind and then swings that leg forward and around in a wide sweeping arc, leaping into the air simultaneously and landing backwards on the foot that was used for the sweeping motion.
  • Toe Loop-the toe loop is usually entered from a ‘forward inside three turn’ and is accomplished with a toe assist in the form of a ‘pick’. After the turn while the skater is moving backwards on an outside skate edge, the skater ‘picks the ice’ with one foot, does a half revolution in the air, and then lands on the foot that did not ‘pick’ the ice. The skater should land in the same position in which they started. This jump was first performed by Bruce Mapes in the 1920s, an American professional show skater. This same jump is performed in artistic roller skating and is called a Mapes Jump.
  • Loop-the loop jump is one of the most easily recognized, most often being done as the second jump in a ‘combination’ jump. With no toe assist, the skater simply takes off from a back outside edge, does a full revolution in the air, and then lands backward on the same edge that was used to launch the jump.
  • Flip-brings to mind somersaults, but is actually much simpler. Gliding backwards on an inside edge, the skater ‘picks’ the ice with the toe of the opposite skate, performs a full revolution in the air, and then lands on the back outside edge of the same skate with which he or she ‘picked’ the ice. The toe assist somewhat resembles a pole vault and the jump is usually entered from an ‘outside three turn’ done in a straight line or from a ‘forward inside mohawk’.
  • Lutz-this jump was first performed by Austrian Alois Lutz during a competition in 1913. Performed similar to a flip, the takeoff is from a back outside edge as opposed to a back inside edge. Staying on that back outside edge while taking off is extremely difficult and points are deducted for rolling to the back inside edge, in which case it becomes a common flip jump. When this error is made, it is commonly referred to as a “flutz”.
  • Axel-First performed in 1882 by Axel Paulsen, the axel jump is launched from a forward outside edge. Making a full one and one-half revolution while airborne, the skater then lands on the opposite foot from the takeoff, on a back outside edge. This jump, when performed as a double (3 full revolutions) or a triple (4.5 turns) is truly amazing.

 I hope this helps you to identify the jumps as they occur on the ice. Personally, I think it is amazing what these skaters do and find it amazing that their whole life has been dedicated to perfecting their performance in arguably the most beautifully performed sporting event in the world.

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You CAN Learn to Ice Skate

by Jassen Bowman

Having been raised in the era of figure skating superstars like Nancy Kerrigan, Michelle Kwan, and Todd Eldridge, I have been fascinated by this beautiful display of athletic prowess for nearly two decades. But, like many things in life, there comes a point where the fascination slips into a desire to do something more than just sit on the couch and watch these happenings on the moving picture box.

Being 30 years old and 50 pounds overweight, part of my brain was telling myself I was absolutely, positively nuts to even be thinking about doing this. Even that first time I stepped onto the ice, I was still telling myself that I was about to be involved in a major medical emergency involving multiple broken bones. Three months later, I am not only injury free, but actually making substantial progress.

So, how does one go about learning how to skate? Like anything else, you have to do your homework. It all begins with identifying a facility in your area that even has a sheet of ice. Most major metropolitan areas of the United States, Canada, and Europe have ice facilities of one form or another. Some ice rinks consist only of frozen lakes, while others offer multiple ice rinks within one large building, complete with locker rooms, concession stands, skate rental, and more. Finding a facility near you begins with a simple Google search or a trip through the phone book.

After identifying an appropriate facility, you must then actually contact the ice rink and inquire as to the availability of group classes or private instruction. Most ice rinks offer public skate sessions during which you can obtain one-on-one instruction from a member of the site staff. Many facilities in America also participate in either the U.S. Figure Skating Association or the Ice Skating Institute basic skating skills programs, which provide a structured course of instruction in either a group format or on an individual basis.

Most people will start with group lessons. The advantage of joining a class is that there is an organized curriculum to the entire process of learning how to ice skate, along with being with a group of people of your own skill level. The cost for group lessons is also significantly less than private instruction. It is common for classes to meet twice per week for about four to six weeks. These types of classes vary in cost depending on where you’re geographically located, but in the United States expect to pay between $60 and $100 for such a class. In addition, you will also likely have to rent skates from the facility you are taking lessons at. However, skate rental is generally very inexpensive, at only a few dollars per session.

If you’re looking to test the waters before jumping into a class, or simply desire the undivided attention of an instructor, then private lessons are a worthwhile option to consider. Meeting once or twice with a private instructor is a great way to get started, especially to help you determine whether or not ice skating is something that you will really enjoy and want to stick with as a hobby. Following private instruction with group classes can give you a head start on learning how to ice skate, especially if you take a private lesson on occasion during the course of being in a class. Private instruction is definitely more costly, but pays for itself in terms of the progress that you can make in your skating skills compared to a group environment. Expect to pay anywhere from $45 to $100 per hour for private instruction, with most lessons lasting about 30 to 45 minutes, depending on your goals and pace.

Personally, my intention was to meet twice, and only twice, with a private instructor, and then maybe take a class, with the thought that doing that much would get the desire to skate out of my system. My primary interest in learning to skate was to have a wee bit of a clue about what it’s like to be on the ice, since I had already made the decision that the only way I could ever actively participate in the sport of figure skating was to be a judge. However, after those two private lessons, I was hooked on skating itself, and now my weekly lessons are a line item in my personal budget.

Ice skating is an addictive form of recreation. Learning to ice skate will provide you with a great sense of personal satisfaction and accomplishment. Whether your interest is purely recreational in nature, or you have an interest in any of the related disciplines such as hockey, ice dancing, or figure skating, ice skating will provide you with a sense of pure elation, and will always provide you with additional challenges should you wish to explore them.

In my next article, I will offer insight into selecting an instructor for private coaching. This relationship is such an important one that it deserves careful consideration. I consider myself extremely fortunate that the “next available instructor” to whom I was assigned is such a talented coach and a good personality fit. However, one should not rely on blind luck or good fortune alone when picking an instructor, so be looking for that article coming soon.

Jassen Bowman is a tax consultant by profession, helping taxpayers obtain the tax relief to which they are legally entitled. Outside of work, his lifelong interest in the sport of figure skating has recently blossomed into an intense drive to learn to ice skate He can be found practicing three or four times per week at his local ice centre.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jassen_Bowman

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New figure skates for novice iceskater

Q. I’ve been skating for 6 months and would like to get my first pair of skates. Where should I go and what do I need to know in advance?

A. Congratulations! First, if you have a private lesson instructor, you should discuss with him or her which boots and blades they prefer for your skill level. Next, go to a reputable dealer who have several brands of boots for you to try. Everyone is different, and it is important to find the right boot for your type of foot! Finally, the “break-in” period for new boots ranges greatly. You may experience soreness, pain and possibly blisters for the first few times you use your new boots. This is normal. Good luck!

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