Tag Archives: ice rink

Gratitude from an Ice Skating Fanatic

Support the Tornado victims at Redcross.com

by Katherine Ruch

In terms of being dedicated to the cause, I have thought about whether or not I’m just really dedicated, slightly nuts, or a happy mix of both? The month of March has held snow, heavy showers and tornadoes around the state of Kentucky. On the day of the Tornado watch while most were running errands and preparing to hunker down, I decided to head to the ice rink like any dedicated crazy person! With an ice rink that is below ground, you can’t be any safer in your basement than at the locker room at the rink! It was a great day to figure skate because there was almost no one there and at it reminded me of what is really important. My friends and family were all safe and I get the gift of doing what I love pretty much every day. Crazy or not, I sure did feel lucky that day.

The month of March holds not just a Competition for me but also a Moves in the Field Test! The competition is going to be interesting simply because I have been putting so much of my effort into this test! It can’t possibly be a good sign that I can count the number of times I have done my program during the last two weeks on both hands! The competition happens to be the weekend after the test so maybe after a breathe a very short sigh of relief I can put all my focus into that!

I know that regardless of how the test pans out, I will be able to say that I put all the preparation into it that I possibly could. I have literally gone through each of the moves countless times, especially those darn Brackets! I’m even thinking about the test while I’m trying to sleep! With a little less than a week before the test, I have devised some goals of my own!
1. Regardless of how the test goes, I will keep skating and giving it my all!

2. Keep smiling regardless. Maybe the judges will be so disturbed they won’t notice what my feet are doing!

3. Remember to Breathe. It wouldn’t be so very funny to pass out in the middle of the test!

Above all, I think I need to remember why I love this sport so very much and reflect on how lucky I am that I get to be a part of it! Already crossing my fingers though!

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Filed under Figure Skating Education, Ice Rinks, Ice Skating Events, Katherine Ruch

Following My Own Instructions: A Plan for this Skating Season.

By Katherine Ruch

Fall is in the air. I make this statement for a whole variety of reasons. The kids are back in school, the school supplies have been bought, Labor Day has come and gone and, most importantly, the ice rink has already been open this season for a few weeks!! While it was closed, it sure seems like I did my fair share of driving to other rinks, complaining about how I missed skating as well as plotting my return.

Looking back on it, is seems that summer flew by faster than ever this year. As the skating year gets off to a fresh start, I must begin to consider where I’m trying to go with skating this year. How in the world do I expect to get anywhere if I don’t put some thought into where it is that I’m trying to go? It would be somewhat like taking a trip without knowing where you were going or having directions.

What is your plan for this skating season?

I’m finding it slightly comical that I told my students they had to make a list of goals they would like to accomplish this year, while I am having trouble making myself do the same thing. I know the rules – you want to make goals that are short and long term and for all areas of your skating.

In terms of this year, I’m having trouble because what I have come up with so far has either been too vague or too pie in the sky. Goals that are too vague include: improving my jumps and spins. What does that really look like? In terms of pie in the sky: landing that elusive Axel seems to come to mind. It really doesn’t get more pie in the sky than wanting to land an Axel before the Mayan calendar runs out in 2012 if I haven’t even started seriously working on it!

So, down to brass tacks! Here are some legit goals for the year and the future:

  1. Find a few competitions to go to this year for myself, and pick a couple to take my students to. I think it may be best to coach at a couple and compete at a couple. I get nervous enough for myself and my students, that combining the two doesn’t seem like a great plan.
  2. Work on the Gold Moves so that I can hopefully at least test them at the end of this skating year. The keyword here is “test” not complete. Although, it would be delightful to pass them the first time!
  3. Finish the Bronze Dances this year- Hickory Hoedown down, the Willow and the Ten Fox still to go.
  4. Improve jump height on all singles and eventually land that darn Axel.
  5. Improve spin positions on sit spin and camel, learn layback and flying camel. Place the emphasis on eventually for that flying camel
  6. Move towards my goal of only teaching Moves in the Field. I’ve discovered this has to be my niche. I love the technical side of skating!!

Now the question goes to you! What would you like to accomplish during this skating year?

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Sports Ethics

by Susan L. Ward

Ethics is a complex philosophical subject because it involves the study of morality and human values. Defining values in terms of sports participation is a difficult task which all coaches must address. What is good? How do we judge what is good? In order to answer these essential questions, we utilize our standards, principles and belief systems. We may not all subscribe to the same values but we can simplify our ethical concerns when we examine issues in terms of minimizing harm and maximizing benefit. When we look at the paradigm of risk management, we can easily understand what “harm” means. Teachers do not cause harm nor do they risk harm to their students. On the positive side of the scale, teachers prevent harm and promote their students’ well being. In his book The Inner Athlete, Dan Millman says, “Second only to parents, teachers of movement can have a profound influence on a student’s self-concept and outlook on life.”

Many coaches teach the way parents learn to be parents: one generation repeating the best and worst of the last generation. It is not enough to know the subject matter and the methodology. It is necessary to have a philosophy, a code. Ask yourself: Why skate? Not everyone can win and we have all seen the importance of winning lead to cheating, soliciting, taking “cheap shots” and other unethical behavior on the part of athletes and coaches. But if winning is not the only thing, what other positive goals you can instill in skaters? If your teaching methods focus on concepts such as character development, sportsmanship, the cultivation of discipline, teamwork, fair play and self-motivation, you know the positive side of the scale: maximizing benefit. Skating is a sport that children cannot pursue without the support of their parents. Parents are legally, financially and morally responsible for their children. They are consumers and they do have rights. Most parents are primarily motivated by what they perceive is best for their child. Parents arrive knowing little if anything about skating but they can certainly be ambitious and competitive for their children. It is unwise to place the parents of your skater in an adversarial role. When a teacher or coach competes with a parent for control of a child, it is a Lose/Lose proposition. Besides, control is never a healthy or realistic goal.

Instead, a coach’s honest ability to communicate with both skater and parent is paramount. Consider the parent as your ally in the development of a well-balanced skater. An educated parent is the best advocate for a young athlete. The principles ‘to keep in mind are not new ones: teach with dignity, equality, privacy, loyalty, commitment, honesty and reliability. Your reputation will grow and the parents of your skaters will respect the work you are doing with their children.

Consider one parent’s perspective on reasonable expectations which parents place on coaches. Ann Masten, an associate professor of Child Psychology at the University of Minnesota and mother of two skaters, wrote the following list, previously published in Focus for parents, the newsletter of the USFSA’s Parents Committee:

What I Expect of My Child’s Coach*

  • - To teach my child this sport to the best of your ability.
  • - To promote the development of my child as a whole person, as well as an athlete.
  • - To respect my child and act in my child’s best interests.
  • - To be aware that you are one of the most important people in my child’s life, and to act accordingly.
  • - To honor the confidences of my child, except when it would endanger my child to do so.
  • - To inform me as soon as possible of any serious problems or concerns about my child or about my parenting as regards my child’s skating.
  • - To clearly communicate your expectations of me in this enterprise.
  • - To keep me informed on a regular basis (such as monthly) of my child’s general progress and to promptly address the questions or concerns that I might raise.
  • - To bill me accurately and with timeliness.

Reprinted with permission of U5F5A’s Focus for parents.

Coaches who deal with parents fairly enhance their own reputation in the arena. On the other hand, dissatisfied customers are all too prone to discuss their problems in the rink. Bad news is often embellished and all rink gossip is damaging. Minimize harm, encourage positive public relations by your own example. Keep the parent-coach-athlete dialogue in confidence.

The primary step in establishing healthy community relations starts with solid credentials. Most people are familiar with state education requirements in their schools. They know what certification signifies. In order to teach one must have learned the subject (skating technique) and how to present knowledge (methodology). Today coaches study physiology and psychology. Be prepared, continue your education and accept your ability as a teacher. Are you a good “kindergarten” teacher? Are you qualified and confident to teach the next grade? Do you realize that at the “end” of the year your child will be promoted? Do you hold back or let go? Are you willing to send the student on the next leg of the journey with your blessing even if you can’t go along?

Most importantly, the best coaches stop to consider their own motivations for coaching and are great motivators of their students. They are consistent in their approach and expectations of their students. They give all skaters a chance to become their personal best and avoid forming snap judgments or permanent opinions of skaters. They know that skaters will mature. No one can truly predict who has the most promise. Coach-motivators know that all people are different and have different styles and rates of learning. The best coaches are never too busy to listen. They keep confidences and promises.

The greatest coaches know that the best motivator is love; love of the sport itself, love of the process and love of teaching. All students benefit from the principles which these coach-motivators impart as part of the process. Everyone who walks into the arena recognizes them, not from their personal accolades, or skating achievements but by the accomplishments and attitudes of their students and the trust which parents place in them. They are real masters who teach with a commitment to excellence.

Reprinted with premission from :

The Professional Skater Magazine
January / February 1997 – pp. 16, 29.
©1997 by Professional Skaters Association

For more articles for skating parents, visit http://www.iceskatingworld.com/parents/letters_articles/index.html

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Filed under Figure Skating Education, Figure Skating Parents, Ice Skating Coaching, IceSkatingWorld.com, Coaches Corner

PR: Regional Skating & Dance Talent can audition to Join the Stars in Wooster, Ohio

News - Parker Pennington, U.S. National Champion at 4 different levels, will be bringing some of his talented friends to Wooster, Ohio for a figure skating and dance show spectacular. Parker, a resident of Westlake, Ohio, will be debuting his new show, Skate Dance Dream presents “The Dream Show” on Saturday August 6, 2011 at 7PM at Alice Noble Arena in Wooster, Ohio.

 The show aims to inspire skaters and dancers throughout the Cleveland area and beyond, by giving them the chance to perform with the Stars.  With a unique blend of the two arts, skating and dancing, the show certainly promises to surprise and excite with jumps, spins, tricks and much more. The most important piece for Parker is to make a difference for all the local skaters and dancers in route to chasing their dreams, by giving them the platform to both perform and learn from their idols. “We feel like if every child is given the opportunity to skate or dance with the Stars and get to spend time learning and being around them, it can only enhance their experience and love for what they do. At the end of the day, I want to be able to create a memory for them that will be everlasting.” says Parker. Parker highlights that performing in the show Scott Hamilton & Friends with his idol Scott Hamilton, undoubtedly kept him inspired and pushed him towards furthering his skating goals.

 Skate Dance Dream presents “The Dream Show” is in many ways, a dream come true for Parker. After producing “Skate for Life” for the Muscular Dystrophy Association in both Connecticut and Ohio, he knew that his heart was set on encouraging the next generation of skating and dancing talent through his productions.  He notes seeing the children’s faces light up being on the same ice as their idols was the icing on the cake that cemented his dream vision. He first conceived the concept back in 2009 and he is excited that the dream project is now coming to fruition. “I am beyond excited to bring this show to Alice Noble Arena. The Wooster Figure Skating Club is such a deserving club to be able to host this and I know their enthusiasm will ignite the show” says Parker.

 The show is set around the theme of inspiration, while holding a constant goal of pushing innovation to the fullest. One aspect that Parker particularly hopes is successful is the outreach to the local skating and dancing communities, by bringing the Stars right to their town. “Obviously one large goal in developing these shows is to help skating and dance grow.” Parker says.  He continues “we even help further skating clubs development by helping them fundraise for their programs, while keeping up with them concluding the show to help guide them to success.” Our philanthropic efforts also offer the chance for clubs within a region of where our shows take place, to receive a grant award for their programs. The show’s incentives range from winning private lessons with the Stars to pizza party with the Stars for the younger kids. The show certainly promises to bring a different spin to the sport of figure skating. Teaming with Riedell Skates, they will be raffling off a pair of new custom made boots and blades.   Additionally, regional skaters and dancers as well can come tryout for a solo or group act, showcasing their skills at the auditions on Saturday, June 25, 2011 at The Cleveland Skating Club from 12-4PM or they can submit a video through the web up until July 1, 2011.

The show boasts a strong cast including skaters, Richard Dornbush, U.S. National Silver medalist; Lynn Kriengkrairut and Logan Giulietti-Schmitt, Skate America competitors and Parker. Also performing will be Jessica King and Gev Manoukian, both Top 10 finalist on Fox’s “So You Think You Can Dance.” More National and World Class Skating and Dancing Stars will be added to the cast, so please check out the website for updates. Cast is subject to change.

 With the show drawing closer, Parker encourages all skaters and dancers of all ages and levels to participate. The registration deadline is July 1, 2011. Skaters and dancers from across the U.S. are also welcome to join! Tickets on sale now: $10 General Admission, $25 On-Ice seating and $50 Front Row. Visit http://thedreamshow.eventbrite.com to order your tickets!

 For sponsorship or promotional opportunities, please contact Philip Shen.

 WANT US to bring SKATE DANCE DREAM to your rink or area? Contact Parker and tell him why you think the show should come to your town!

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Ice Skating Prodigy? You Be the Judge

Click the YouTube video link below to see Natalie, a 23 1/2 month old, skating at the Tampa Bay Skating Academy on June 23, 2011

http://e-junkie.tv/r.swf?id=19697

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Filed under Figure Skating Parents, Ice Rinks, Learn to Skate

Summer and the Closing of an Ice Rink

By Katherine Ruch

I would be the first to admit that I have a love hate relationship with ice skating. It really seems to depend on the time of year. Summer means a bunch of different things to different people. Most associate the summer with the kids being out of school, family vacations and rising temperatures. Lots of people enjoy the slower pace of summer while others are counting down the days till the kids go back to school so that things can go back to life as “usual.” I hate to admit it, but I am one of those people. It’s not that I have anything against summer, it really just says more about the fact that my life pretty much revolves around ice skating.

 

The concept of summer has changed a great deal for me since I was a kid. I used to long for the day when I could have a couple months off without having to worry about school. I could do all the things I dreamed of doing and had what seemed like endless stretches of time to fit it all in. Ever since I became involved with ice skating, I have begun to associate the climbing temperatures with the annual season closing of the rink.

 

Everyone knows that you always want what you can’t have. I find that a great majority of my time during the summer is taken up by skating and yes I know that sounds hypocritical since I just mentioned the fact that the rink is closed. While I’m not spending hours on the ice each day during the summer months, that doesn’t stop me from thinking about skating almost all of the time, even while I’m asleep.

 

While I am working at that pesky part time job, I can also be found figuring out the logistics of what it looks like to keep skating during the summer. The questions that often swirl in my head involve: “where to go skating next and when? Who can I talk into taking a few lessons during the summer? Are there any conferences, seminars and competitions that I want to go to either for my own skating or to help with my coaching endeavors?” The most looming question of all has been “what possessed me to want to enter a competition during the off season and how am I ever going to get in enough practice time?”

 

For those of you whose rinks don’t close during the summer, consider yourself very lucky. It is quite common when the pools open for ice rinks to just close up shop for awhile. Most don’t want to go skating when they can go to the pool. If your rink is open, try to get in as much practice time as you can this summer. If your rink is not open, don’t let that discourage you. If you are a skater, talk to the other skaters or your coach about carpooling somewhere to get some ice time in. If you are a coach, round up those students and take trips to other rinks. As somebody who has skated at lots of other rinks over a number of years, it is not nearly as scary as it may seem to go skate somewhere else for a couple of hours. While each rink has its own set of unwritten rules, one thing holds true and that is that there are people everywhere who love skating. That is something that will hopefully never change!

 

@IceSkatingWorld

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5 Ways to Make Better Progress this Season

by Marta Nilsen, PSA Master-rated coach

Here are five steps for improving your figure skating and making better progress during the upcoming season.

1) Add another day of skating to your week.

Adding another day of skating per week can speed up your progress dramatically. If you can’t add another day, the next best thing would be to add two more hours per week of skating time. Instead of skating one hour per day for two days per week, instead skate two hours per day, two days per week.

2) Take a ballet class at least one day per week.

Ballet increases flexibility, strengthens body alignment and placement, and teaches proper jumping technique. This is a great way to get that super spiral or increase your jump height.

3) Participate in off-ice classes at least one time per week.

Off-ice class is not just another workout. You will be practicing simulating skills that are done on the ice. Practicing off ice allows you to feel, see and understand the basic positions that your body must attain during skating moves. You will also learn exercises and stretches that can do at home.

4) Go to at least three competitions away from your home rink this season.

Competitions push you to increase your skill level faster than any other method of training. Striving to do your best in a competition helps you to reach the goals that you set for your skating.

5) Set goals.

You need a plan for where you are going and a process for how to get there. You decide where you would like to be, which you discuss with your coach, and then he or she makes a plan to help you reach it. All successful people set goals to help them reach their greatest potential.

Best of luck this ice skating season!

www.iceskatingworld.com

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Filed under Learn to Skate, Figure Skating Education, Ice Skating Articles

New Page! Jobs in Figure Skating

IceSkatingWorld LLC has partnered with Simply Hired to provide an employment section to help people get started in the great sport of figure skating or find their dream job in the industry.

Looking for a full, seasonal or a part time position at an ice rink? Click here for the IceSkatingWorld.com’s Jobs Board. If you are seeking an ice skating career, this is your site.

Ice Rink Managers: Reach thousands of interested and qualified skating enthusiasts by posting your job listing on our Jobs Boards. It’s only $12 for a 90-day listing!

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Ice Skating – Taking Up the Sport After Winter Olympics Inspiration

by Martha Dickinson

Feeling inspired by the excitement of the Winter Olympics? Many people have been entranced by the grace and physicality of Ice Skating after watching the sport unfold during the Winter Olympics, and are looking into taking up the sport themselves. This is a great idea, as Ice Skating can have very positive physical results as well as being a ton of fun, but there are things to keep in mind when you set about starting to go Ice Skating.

First up, you will need to be sure you have the right skates and safety equipment. Will you require any special pads when you start skating? Check out the various dedicated ice skating websites and blogs that are easy to find online for advice on how best to start out.

Once you have the gear to get started with, the next phase is to take some lessons by a certified and experienced skating tutor. The first things you need to be taught are safety issues, how to stay upright, how to fall if you have an accident, and other essential matters that you need to be familiar with.

Once these issues are ingrained in your mind you can move onto the basics of the skating sport and then onto greater moves as your experience and confidence builds. You may not be able to pull off the graceful moves of your Olympic heroes, but soon you will have the basics mastered and be able to see just what you are capable of, while becoming fitter and healthier due to the powerful workout that this kind of skating can give the body.

It’s a great sport to share with friends, so how about you ask around and see if anyone else you know would like to join in? To a beginner, skating on ice can seem daunting, but by finding good ice skating rinks and tutors, and with the right gear, you can start ice skating with confidence.

Martha is a health, exercise and lifestyle expert who loves to help people discover more about life and what it can offer. Are you feeling inspired by the Olympics? Check out more information online!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Martha_Dickinson

@IceSkatingWorld

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Ice Skating Tips For Figure Skaters

by Francis Murphy

While some novice ice skaters decided to learn ice skating all by themselves which are possible, it is actually recommended to get some professional skating lessons if possible. There are many advantages of taking these lessons and it is not hard to find a skating rink which is near to your home.

Here are what we can share on Ice skating tips:

a. How to fall: Falling is unavoidable especially for new learners in ice skating but falling can be risky at the same time. Thus it is valuable to learn how to minimize the risk of injury when falling. Some good tips would be to wear ice skating protective gear set such as helmet, wrist, elbow, knee and hips pads to minimize the impact of the injury.

b. Getting professional guidance on ice skating if you are a beginner is the most important tips of all. This is the only way where the beginner can learn how to fall without injuring himself, how to stand still and how to skate properly.

c. If you are skating outside the ring, making sure that the ice is thick enough to support your weight is some basic pre-skating checking to safe-guard your safety.

d. Learning how to make an abrupt stop swiftly is one of the key tips for every ice skater – this is called the Hockey Stop. Then there are T-Stop, Snowplow Stop, and also backward T-Stop and other kinds of stopping tips which one gets to learn to be a good ice skater.

e. Wear warm, comfortable clothing and appropriate socks made of microfiber or synthetic are the best for ice skating. Keep in mind that the rink’s temperature is 50-60 degrees, therefore a light jacket, sweater, windbreaker is advisable. Get some gloves or mitten made of wool or acrylic type is best.

f. It is important to make sure you tie your ice skates the correct way. It is best to tie your skates fairly loose at the bottom part. In the middle part of the skate, where the ankle is, it is good to pull the laces tight. This will give the support that your ankles need to hold you up while you are skating. And at the very top part of the skates, it should be the loosest part so that it will be easier for you to bend your knees which is very important in ice skating.

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